So, she wants to decorate and you are watching the budget.  Let her splurge on window treatments, on one condition, of course.  The window treatments must help keep the heat out during the summer.

Windows act much like the glass of a greenhouse to trap the sunlight streaming infrared energy into the house.  Once it is inside, the temperatures rise and the air conditioner must work to remove the heat.  Residents can use any method to effective shade the window to block the light and solar energy entering the window, thus reducing the load on the HVAC system and ultimately, the electric bill.  While blackout curtains are one option, few people want to bump around in their home with no outside lighting coming in.  There are many choices to reduce the infiltration of sunlight without affecting the room’s aesthetics or blocking your view out the window.

Roll-up shades are one of the oldest ways of blocking the incoming heat and light.  These basic devices, especially in white can reflect the incoming heat energy.  For best results, close the shades early in the day, before the direct sunlight strikes the window.

Awnings offer an island of shade created around windows to reduce solar heat transmission without blocking one’s view.  The addition of an awning over windows facing the sun can often reduce the heat gain by up to 45%.

Windows facing the sun on the south, east and west sides of the home can also benefit from draperies.  Choose light colors that reflect the heat instead of absorbing it.  Another option is to choose drapes that have a reflective backing.  Drapes should be closed early in the morning before the heat begins to accumulate in the room.

Solar screens are made of polyester material that is tightly woven and ultra-thin.  They are mounted outside the window in place of conventional screens.  From inside the home, they are almost invisible, but can absorb up to 80% of the energy produced by the sun, without blocking natural sunlight in the home.

Solar window films, applied to the glass, reflect only the wavelengths of the sun’s energy that produce heat.  They are available in lighter films that are more transparent and reflect some of the heat but allow most of the incoming light to enter, preserving the outdoor view.  A heavier option, offers a mirror like film that reflect nearly all the energy, but inhibits the light transmitted through the window and may block the view.

Do you have questions about your home’s energy usage? The comfort specialists at Hobaica Services are ready to help.  Follow us on Facebook www.facebook.com/hobaicaservices for regular updates, consumer information and general fun stuff for every Home Owner.

Hobaica Services @ www.hobaica.com or 602-995-0387